Reviews

My Mother’s Son – Interview with Deborah Kalb

May 3, 2018

Q&A with David Hirshberg – May 3, 2018 (http://deborahkalbbooks.blogspot.com) David Hirshberg, the pseudonym for an entrepreneur and business executive, is the author of the new novel My Mother’s Son, which takes place in Boston in the 1950s. Q: How did you come up with the idea for My Mother’s Son, and for the family you […]

Read More

My Mother’s Son – Elyse Walters’ Blog

May 2, 2018

“My Mother’s Son” by David Hirshberg Elyse Walters Nov 10, 2017 A highly pleasurable novel…engrossing and irresistible! We are transported back to the 1950’s through the voice of Joel, who for forty-seven years had worked as a radio raconteur. Upon retirement, Joel writes his memoir: “Reflected in it is a story both personal and universal that […]

Read More

My Mother’s Son – Books and Blintzes

May 2, 2018

Books and Blintzes – January 29, 2018 (https://booksandblintzes.com/category/literature/book-reviews/) David Hirsherg’s debut novel My Mother’s Son is a celebration of family in all its complex imperfections. The narrative centers around a retiring radio personality, Joel, telling his own story about growing up in post-war Boston. Local and international politics, the relationships between Joel’s Jewish and other […]

Read More

My Mother’s Son – Phil Jason Reviews Books

May 2, 2018

(https://philjason.wordpress.com/2018/05/01/melting-pot-boston-in-mid-twentieth-century-explored-from-jewish-perspective/) This is one beautiful book. It portrays a pivotal period in U. S. history flavored by the scrambling lives of European immigrants, their acculturated children, and their more fully Americanized grandchildren. Its action springs from family and historical events of 1952-1953, though it manages to cover decades both before and after. The narrator, not […]

Read More

Barbara Solomon Josselsohn, author of The Last Dreamer

October 17, 2017

Sometimes it’s the lies we grow up with — more than the truths — that define who we are and where we come from. That’s the message of David Hirshberg’s coming-of-age novel, My Mother’s Son. Through the eyes of young Joel, we witness essential elements of the mid-twentieth century: the scourge of polio, the magic […]

Read More

Pogrebin Jewish Year

COLORADO REVIEW Examines MY JEWISH YEAR

June 1, 2017

Reviewer Eric Maroney offers a close, careful reading of Abigail Pogrebin’s My Jewish Year.

Read More

Pogrebin Jewish Year

“Standout” MY JEWISH YEAR Is “Highly Recommended”

May 25, 2017

“This standout addition to books about the Jewish calendar presents a wholly new view of all 18 of the annual holy days and commemorative historical days in a witty conversational manner that reads like a novel. Woven throughout are history, traditions and their significance, modern perspectives, inspirational rabbinic commentary, and lots of humor that painlessly builds the reader’s Jewish holiday literacy. Highly recommended.”

Read More

Pogrebin Jewish Year

“Proof of the Enduring Ability of Judaism to Withstand the Permutations of History and Culture”

May 22, 2017

In which Janice Weizman reviews (and basically raves about) our Abigail Pogrebin’s MY JEWISH YEAR in a most thoughtful and comprehensive piece.

Read More

Pogrebin Jewish Year

SHELF AWARENESS Reviews MY JEWISH YEAR

April 11, 2017

“Abigail Pogrebin’s casual relationship with Judaism never troubled her until she realized that, despite the wonderful people in her family and the accomplishments she attained, she felt spiritually devoid of purpose. Not having paid much attention previously, she decides to observe all 18 Jewish holidays over the course of a year in hopes of understanding […]

Read More

Pogrebin Jewish Year

THE NEW YORK TIMES Reviews MY JEWISH YEAR

April 7, 2017

“According to the writer Leon Wieseltier, the greatest scandal among American Jews is illiteracy. We simply don’t know enough — not nearly enough — about who we are and what Jews believe….The journalist Abigail Pogrebin, who interviewed Wieseltier for her book about Jewish identity, ‘Stars of David,’ takes his cri de coeur seriously. In ‘My Jewish Year,’ she becomes curious about how Jews search for meaning — ‘something tugged at me, telling me there was more to feel than I’d felt, more to understand than I knew’ — and decides to celebrate all the Jewish holidays of the calendar year, even the ones she’s never heard of.”

Read More